Scala World 2016

Rheged Centre, Lake District, UK

Main event: 12-13 Sept / Full experience: 8-14 Sept

Two days of intermediate and advanced Scala talks from
the best international speakers, two days of FP training,
organised walks and biking in the beautiful English
countryside, an exquisite conference dinner, lecture
and free bar, and the Typelevel Workshop!

Registration has now closed.

Tickets

Registration has now closed.

Raúl Raja

Manohar Jonnalagedda

Dick Wall

Ólafur Páll Geirsson

Chris Vogt

Aleksandar Prokopec

Jon Pretty

Brendan McAdams

Paul Szulc

Andrew Phillips

Lukas Rytz

Martin Odersky

Rob Norris

Philipp Haller

Rory Graves

Noel Markham

Vlad Ureche

Sam Halliday

Roland Kuhn

Bodil Stokke

Josh Suereth

Travis Brown

Dave Gurnell

Advanced FP
training

THU
8
SEPT

Advanced FP
training

FRI
9
SEPT

Organised
hiking

SAT
10
SEPT

Hiking &
cycling

SUN
11
SEPT

Scala World
day 1

MON
12
SEPT

Scala World
day 2

TUE
13
SEPT

Typelevel
Workshop

WED
14
SEPT

The Venue

Scala World will take place at the Rheged Centre, a modern conference centre near Penrith in the Lake District National Park. This beautiful setting provides us with a great opportunity to combine a passion for functional programming with the Great Outdoors.

The Rheged Centre

The Rheged Centre has established itself as a local destination for food, the outdoors, arts and culture, with a selection of unique shops, cafés, a gallery and a small food hall promoting a fantastic selection of local produce, including many regional ales.

At our disposal for Scala World, we have a large 260-seat auditorium, which will host the main track of talks, and the smaller Pennine Gallery (for up to 100 people) for the eight workshop sessions planned over the two days. On the first night of the conference, we will host a three-course conference dinner in Rheged’s grand Mountain Hall.

The Rheged Centre is fully wheelchair-friendly, with step-free access to all areas. Please enquire if you have any particular mobility requirements.

The Lake District

Choosing to hold a functional programming conference in the Lake District was no coincidence. Many developers in the Scala community are known to be keen walkers and mountaineers, and the opportunity to combine a love of programming with a love of the outdoors was too good to overlook. From “Britain’s favourite view” at Wast Water in the west, to Grasmere in central Lakeland – described by William Wordsworth as “the loveiest spot that man hath ever found” – to the dramatic climbs of Helvellyn and Striding Edge, the Lakes offer some of the best sights in England.

So where better to come to learn and share Scala ideas?

Getting There

As one of the more remote areas of Britain’s countryside, most attendees will need to travel some distance to get to Lakeland. Nevertheless, the Lake District, in particular Penrith, is well connected. If travelling by car, the town is just a couple of minutes from the M6 motorway, between Glasgow two hours to the north, and Manchester two hours to the south. Both cities have international airports with direct flights to Europe and the USA. Additionally, Edinburgh, Newcastle and Liverpool airports are all easily within reach by car.

Penrith train station also provides good connections to both Glasgow Airport (2h20), Manchester Airport (1h40) and to London (3h00), with trains leaving approximately once an hour to and from each of those locations.

For visitors coming from outside the UK, we recommend flying into Manchester Airport and either hiring a car, or taking the train directly from the airport to Penrith. Glasgow and Edinburgh Airports are viable alternatives, with slightly longer journey times to Penrith by train.

Getting around

Travelling around Lakeland is easiest with a car, but if that is not an option, public transport is available along the major routes. The X4 and X5 bus routes pass between the towns of Penrith and Keswick, both stopping at the Rheged Centre along the way. Additionally, we will be putting on a free shuttle bus between Penrith and the Rheged Centre from 8-9am every morning of the conference, and for an hour after the end of each conference day.

Staying in the Lake District

As one of the UK’s favourite tourist destinations, the Lake District has a wealth of places to stay, including hotels, self-catering cottages, guesthouses and hostels, not to mention camping. The dates of Scala World are towards the end of the summer tourist season, and although it is after the start of the school term and fewer families will be holidaying at that time, demand for rooms may still be high, so we recommend booking early.

For easy access to the conference, the small towns of Penrith and Keswick both offer a variety of accommodation options, and Carlisle, a little further afield (and outside the National Park) the city of Carlisle, on the historic Hadrian’s Wall, should provide further possibilities. In addition, there are dozens of holiday cottages in the many Lakeland villages all within reach of the venue. However, we would recommend checking journey times before booking, as roads within the Lakes are not always guaranteed to be quick. They are, however, guaranteed to be scenic.

Activities

Hiking in the Lake District, known as fellwalking, is the best way to experience the beautiful scenery of the lakes and mountains of Cumbria. A few villages and small towns are sprinkled across the landscape, nestled in the valleys and around the shores of the lakes, but much of the countryside of Lakeland, particularly the central fells, is wilderness, and as distant from bustling cities as you will find anywhere in England.

Equipment

Paths up to the mountains in Lakeland vary from well-kept tracks to barely existent memories, and while paved paths and stone steps are common, other routes may involve walking across bogs, through streambeds or up steep scrambles, needing the use of four or more limbs. As an absolute minimum, we recommend a pair of good walking boots, preferably waterproof; if in doubt about their ability to withstand water, waterproof socks are available from many of the local outdoor shops in Keswick and Ambleside, and are a valuable investment which can make the difference between an enjoyable hike and a laborious trudge.

A lightweight waterproof jacket and waterproof trousers should be worn if rain is expected, though in sunshine on a clear day, shorts and t-shirt are a more comfortable choice, and should be adequate, provided you don't linger in strong winds. If in doubt, pack an extra layer.

Another useful piece of equipment when climbing is a stick, or walking pole. Although not particularly useful on the ascent, a stick (or two) will transfer some of the burden of the descent from your legs to your arms, and you will appreciate it for days afterwards.

Weather

The Lake Distract does not get its name from its many dry valleys, and the rain is what helps to sculpt the beautiful scenery. Whilst we can put together a fantastic indoors programme for Scala World, controlling the outdoors is beyond our capabilities, so we are, as ever, at the mercy of Britain’s skies. Nevertheless, being early September, the weather will still be mild, if not warm, and the mountains will be free from snow. If it rains, a wet day should not mean staying indoors: walking in rain is a different experience, but with good waterproofs it can be just as enjoyable.

Mist and fog often feature heavily in Cumbrian weather, sometimes across the entire area, and other times localized to valleys. Be very careful in mist: from afar, it can produce wonderful effects as mountains can seem to appear then disappear in an instant behind a cloud, though close-at-hand, it can be very disorientating, aside from being difficult to see where you are going. Ensure you have a map and compass with you, and check local forecasts before setting out. If mist is a problem, do not diverge from well-established paths.

Driving

Lakeland can offer many memorable scenic drives through bucolic lowlands, and over historic highland passes, and these can be just as much fun in the wet or the dry. In fact, some would argue that a holiday in Britain is not a proper holiday if you don’t get to spend at least a day looking at rain on the windscreen.

From Penrith, we suggest the following driving route. Taking between three and four hours, the route heads west towards Keswick along the main A66 road, before climbing over the Dunmail Raise and down through Grasmere to Ambleside. From Ambleside, we travel into the Great Langdale Valley, and over the beautifully remote Wrynose Pass, following the river towards the lowlands of the Dunnerdale Valley. From here we take an elevated route over Austhwaite Brow, revealing a spectacular panorama of the Central Fells. We return east across the Hardknott Pass, the steepest road in the Britain (with a gradient of 1 in 3) and approach the Wrynose Pass from the opposite direction. Returning to Ambleside, we take the Kirkstone Pass road over the fells to Glenridding, and Ullswater. From here we head northeast, back to Penrith.

The route has a selection of stopping places en route, and offer plenty of opportunities to take photographs on the way. A number of traditional pubs and inns are also dotted along the route, should you wish to stop for sustenance on the way.

Like last year, each Scala World speaker will be given one of Wainwright’s delightful pictorial guides to the Lakes and asked to choose a walk. These guides provide wonderfully-detailed descriptions of routes through the mountains, and are a recommended read for anyone planning on hiking at Scala World. Additionally, the Ordnance Survey’s Explorer Map Series sheets OL4, OL5, OL6 and OL7 provide clear and detailed coverage of the entire Lakes region. Note that weatherproof versions are available.

Above all, activities in the Lakes are meant to be fun, so take precautions, and stay safe!

Advanced FP with Scala

Enter a Scala developer...leave a master of functional programming!

You already know Scala, but how well do you really know functional programming? The world of functional programming extends way beyond simple pattern matching and recursion!

The number of battle-tested Scala libraries that rely on advanced techniques in functional programming is rapidly growing. This list includes such hits as Scalaz-Stream (FS2), Shapeless, Scalaz, Cats, Spire, Matryoshka, FreeK, and countless others. In addition, more and more companies rely on advanced functional programming in Scala to build powerful, robust, and scalable applications that are correct-by-construction.

In this intense, two-day workshop, you will thoroughly learn the concepts necessary to dramatically improve your skills at advanced functional programming in Scala.

You'll go way beyond the basics as you learn about catamorphisms, type-level functions, fixed-point data, reified computation, endofunctors, lenses, and much more. When you're finished, you'll know how to build robust, type-safe, comprehensible functional programs.

No matter your past track record with functional programming, this workshop is your chance to finally understand the techniques and principles at a deep level, and to become the master of functional programming you were meant to be!

About LambdaConf

LambdaConf is one of the largest conferences on functional programming in the world. Organized by the non-profit Fantasyland Institute of Learning, the conference helps developers everywhere use functional programming to build software that's easier to compose, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.

About John A. De Goes

John A. De Goes has been writing Scala software for more than seven years at multiple companies, and has assembled world-renowned Scala engineering teams, trained new developers in Scala, and developed several successful open source Scala projects. Known for his ability to take very complex concepts and explain them simply, John has taught numerous workshops and classes before, including a highly-regarded workshop on Scala programming.

While John moonlights as an instructor for LambdaConf, his primary job is Chief Technology Officer of SlamData, an open source software company using pure functional programming to redefine analytics for modern data.

Prerequisites

No advanced knowledge of Scala is required. However, you should be a competent Scala programmer, familiar with the syntax and semantics of case classes, traits, functions, and methods.

You should also bring a laptop computer equipped with the Scala compiler, the Scala Build Tool (SBT), and a text editor or IDE of your choice. You will be encouraged to complete exercises and a final workshop assignment.

Preliminary Schedule

Thursday, 8 September 2016
9.30am Introduction
10.00am Mastering Types
  • Type Theory 101
  • Product types & Sum types
  • Supertypes & Subtypes
  • Universals & Existentials
  • Higher-Kinded Types
  • Type Lambdas
1.00pm Lunch
2.00pm Mastering Functions
  • Higher-Order Functions
  • Combinators
  • Polymorphic Functions
3.00pm Mastering Typeclasses
  • Classes & Instances
  • Tricks with Implicits
  • Polymorphic Constraints
4.00pm Mastering Functional Data
  • Immutable Data & Recursion
  • Catamorphisms & Church Encoding
  • Fixed-Point Data
  • Recursion Schemes
6.00pm End of day
Friday, 9 September 2016
9.30am Introduction
10.00am Mastering Functional Patterns
  • Options, Eithers & Validations
  • Semigroups & Monoids
  • Functors
  • Applicatives
  • Monads
  • Foldables & Traversables
  • Lenses
1.00pm Lunch
2.00pm Mastering Functional Architecture
  • Modern Architecture for FP
  • Reified Computation & Deferred Evaluation
  • Compositional Evaluators
  • Optimization Techniques
  • Purely Functional Mocking
6.00pm End of day

Join the Course!

This fantastic training course is being offered on 8-9 September for only £1000+VAT, or with a 25% discount for any attendees who are self-funding it, at £750+VAT. A full breakfast and lunch at the Rheged Café are included in the cost. You can book your place on the course when registering for Scala World. We will provide an additional option later for anyone who would like to register separately for Advanced Functional Programming in Scala.

Tuesday, 13 September

Shuttle bus from Sandgate, Penrith, to Rheged Centre

Sandgate Bus Station, Penrith town centre
7.45

Breakfast

Exhibition Halls
9.00

Day Two Welcome

Auditorium
9.30

Tuesday Keynote

Josh Suereth, Dick Wall, Auditorium
10.30

Break

Exhibition Halls

Can we make concurrency in Scala safer?

Philipp Haller, Auditorium
10.45

Free Monads

Paul Szulc, Lecture Theatre
11.30

Break

Exhibition Halls
11.45

First-class coroutines for Scala

Aleksandar Prokopec, Auditorium
12.15

Lunch

Exhibition Halls

quaich: A “serverless” microframework for event-driven Scala Programming on AWS Lambda

Brendan McAdams, Lecture Theatre
13.30

Tales from Compiling to the JVM

Lukas Rytz, Auditorium
14.15

Staged Parser Combinators

Manohar Jonnalagedda, Auditorium
15.00

Break

Exhibition Halls

Essential vs. Accidental Complexity in Scala & Dotty: Towards a Puzzler-free Future?

Andrew Phillips, Lecture Theatre
15.15

The Story of a Parallel Scala Library

Vlad Ureche, Auditorium
16.00

Managing Your Resources

Denys Shabalin, Auditorium
16.45

Break

Exhibition Halls
17.00

Closing panel

Auditorium
18.00

Close

18.30

Bus from Rheged Centre to Penrith

Rheged Centre Car Park

The Venue

Scala World will take place at the Rheged Centre, a modern conference centre near Penrith in the Lake District National Park. This beautiful setting provides us with a great opportunity to combine a passion for functional programming with the Great Outdoors.

The Rheged Centre

The Rheged Centre has established itself as a local destination for food, the outdoors, arts and culture, with a selection of unique shops, cafés, a gallery and a small food hall promoting a fantastic selection of local produce, including many regional ales.

At our disposal for Scala World, we have a large 260-seat auditorium, which will host the main track of talks, and the smaller Pennine Gallery (for up to 100 people) for the eight workshop sessions planned over the two days. On the first night of the conference, we will host a three-course conference dinner in Rheged’s grand Mountain Hall.

The Rheged Centre is fully wheelchair-friendly, with step-free access to all areas. Please enquire if you have any particular mobility requirements.

The Lake District

Choosing to hold a functional programming conference in the Lake District was no coincidence. Many developers in the Scala community are known to be keen walkers and mountaineers, and the opportunity to combine a love of programming with a love of the outdoors was too good to overlook. From “Britain’s favourite view” at Wast Water in the west, to Grasmere in central Lakeland – described by William Wordsworth as “the loveiest spot that man hath ever found” – to the dramatic climbs of Helvellyn and Striding Edge, the Lakes offer some of the best sights in England.

So where better to come to learn and share Scala ideas?

Getting There

As one of the more remote areas of Britain’s countryside, most attendees will need to travel some distance to get to Lakeland. Nevertheless, the Lake District, in particular Penrith, is well connected. If travelling by car, the town is just a couple of minutes from the M6 motorway, between Glasgow two hours to the north, and Manchester two hours to the south. Both cities have international airports with direct flights to Europe and the USA. Additionally, Edinburgh, Newcastle and Liverpool airports are all easily within reach by car.

Penrith train station also provides good connections to both Glasgow Airport (2h20), Manchester Airport (1h40) and to London (3h00), with trains leaving approximately once an hour to and from each of those locations.

For visitors coming from outside the UK, we recommend flying into Manchester Airport and either hiring a car, or taking the train directly from the airport to Penrith. Glasgow and Edinburgh Airports are viable alternatives, with slightly longer journey times to Penrith by train.

Getting around

Travelling around Lakeland is easiest with a car, but if that is not an option, public transport is available along the major routes. The X4 and X5 bus routes pass between the towns of Penrith and Keswick, both stopping at the Rheged Centre along the way. Additionally, we will be putting on a free shuttle bus between Penrith and the Rheged Centre from 8-9am every morning of the conference, and for an hour after the end of each conference day.

Staying in the Lake District

As one of the UK’s favourite tourist destinations, the Lake District has a wealth of places to stay, including hotels, self-catering cottages, guesthouses and hostels, not to mention camping. The dates of Scala World are towards the end of the summer tourist season, and although it is after the start of the school term and fewer families will be holidaying at that time, demand for rooms may still be high, so we recommend booking early.

For easy access to the conference, the small towns of Penrith and Keswick both offer a variety of accommodation options, and Carlisle, a little further afield (and outside the National Park) the city of Carlisle, on the historic Hadrian’s Wall, should provide further possibilities. In addition, there are dozens of holiday cottages in the many Lakeland villages all within reach of the venue. However, we would recommend checking journey times before booking, as roads within the Lakes are not always guaranteed to be quick. They are, however, guaranteed to be scenic.

Activities

Hiking in the Lake District, known as fellwalking, is the best way to experience the beautiful scenery of the lakes and mountains of Cumbria. A few villages and small towns are sprinkled across the landscape, nestled in the valleys and around the shores of the lakes, but much of the countryside of Lakeland, particularly the central fells, is wilderness, and as distant from bustling cities as you will find anywhere in England.

Equipment

Paths up to the mountains in Lakeland vary from well-kept tracks to barely existent memories, and while paved paths and stone steps are common, other routes may involve walking across bogs, through streambeds or up steep scrambles, needing the use of four or more limbs. As an absolute minimum, we recommend a pair of good walking boots, preferably waterproof; if in doubt about their ability to withstand water, waterproof socks are available from many of the local outdoor shops in Keswick and Ambleside, and are a valuable investment which can make the difference between an enjoyable hike and a laborious trudge.

A lightweight waterproof jacket and waterproof trousers should be worn if rain is expected, though in sunshine on a clear day, shorts and t-shirt are a more comfortable choice, and should be adequate, provided you don't linger in strong winds. If in doubt, pack an extra layer.

Another useful piece of equipment when climbing is a stick, or walking pole. Although not particularly useful on the ascent, a stick (or two) will transfer some of the burden of the descent from your legs to your arms, and you will appreciate it for days afterwards.

Weather

The Lake Distract does not get its name from its many dry valleys, and the rain is what helps to sculpt the beautiful scenery. Whilst we can put together a fantastic indoors programme for Scala World, controlling the outdoors is beyond our capabilities, so we are, as ever, at the mercy of Britain’s skies. Nevertheless, being early September, the weather will still be mild, if not warm, and the mountains will be free from snow. If it rains, a wet day should not mean staying indoors: walking in rain is a different experience, but with good waterproofs it can be just as enjoyable.

Mist and fog often feature heavily in Cumbrian weather, sometimes across the entire area, and other times localized to valleys. Be very careful in mist: from afar, it can produce wonderful effects as mountains can seem to appear then disappear in an instant behind a cloud, though close-at-hand, it can be very disorientating, aside from being difficult to see where you are going. Ensure you have a map and compass with you, and check local forecasts before setting out. If mist is a problem, do not diverge from well-established paths.

Driving

Lakeland can offer many memorable scenic drives through bucolic lowlands, and over historic highland passes, and these can be just as much fun in the wet or the dry. In fact, some would argue that a holiday in Britain is not a proper holiday if you don’t get to spend at least a day looking at rain on the windscreen.

From Penrith, we suggest the following driving route. Taking between three and four hours, the route heads west towards Keswick along the main A66 road, before climbing over the Dunmail Raise and down through Grasmere to Ambleside. From Ambleside, we travel into the Great Langdale Valley, and over the beautifully remote Wrynose Pass, following the river towards the lowlands of the Dunnerdale Valley. From here we take an elevated route over Austhwaite Brow, revealing a spectacular panorama of the Central Fells. We return east across the Hardknott Pass, the steepest road in the Britain (with a gradient of 1 in 3) and approach the Wrynose Pass from the opposite direction. Returning to Ambleside, we take the Kirkstone Pass road over the fells to Glenridding, and Ullswater. From here we head northeast, back to Penrith.

The route has a selection of stopping places en route, and offer plenty of opportunities to take photographs on the way. A number of traditional pubs and inns are also dotted along the route, should you wish to stop for sustenance on the way.

Like last year, each Scala World speaker will be given one of Wainwright’s delightful pictorial guides to the Lakes and asked to choose a walk. These guides provide wonderfully-detailed descriptions of routes through the mountains, and are a recommended read for anyone planning on hiking at Scala World. Additionally, the Ordnance Survey’s Explorer Map Series sheets OL4, OL5, OL6 and OL7 provide clear and detailed coverage of the entire Lakes region. Note that weatherproof versions are available.

Above all, activities in the Lakes are meant to be fun, so take precautions, and stay safe!

Advanced FP with Scala

Enter a Scala developer...leave a master of functional programming!

You already know Scala, but how well do you really know functional programming? The world of functional programming extends way beyond simple pattern matching and recursion!

The number of battle-tested Scala libraries that rely on advanced techniques in functional programming is rapidly growing. This list includes such hits as Scalaz-Stream (FS2), Shapeless, Scalaz, Cats, Spire, Matryoshka, FreeK, and countless others. In addition, more and more companies rely on advanced functional programming in Scala to build powerful, robust, and scalable applications that are correct-by-construction.

In this intense, two-day workshop, you will thoroughly learn the concepts necessary to dramatically improve your skills at advanced functional programming in Scala.

You'll go way beyond the basics as you learn about catamorphisms, type-level functions, fixed-point data, reified computation, endofunctors, lenses, and much more. When you're finished, you'll know how to build robust, type-safe, comprehensible functional programs.

No matter your past track record with functional programming, this workshop is your chance to finally understand the techniques and principles at a deep level, and to become the master of functional programming you were meant to be!

About LambdaConf

LambdaConf is one of the largest conferences on functional programming in the world. Organized by the non-profit Fantasyland Institute of Learning, the conference helps developers everywhere use functional programming to build software that's easier to compose, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.

About John A. De Goes

John A. De Goes has been writing Scala software for more than seven years at multiple companies, and has assembled world-renowned Scala engineering teams, trained new developers in Scala, and developed several successful open source Scala projects. Known for his ability to take very complex concepts and explain them simply, John has taught numerous workshops and classes before, including a highly-regarded workshop on Scala programming.

While John moonlights as an instructor for LambdaConf, his primary job is Chief Technology Officer of SlamData, an open source software company using pure functional programming to redefine analytics for modern data.

Prerequisites

No advanced knowledge of Scala is required. However, you should be a competent Scala programmer, familiar with the syntax and semantics of case classes, traits, functions, and methods.

You should also bring a laptop computer equipped with the Scala compiler, the Scala Build Tool (SBT), and a text editor or IDE of your choice. You will be encouraged to complete exercises and a final workshop assignment.

Preliminary Schedule

Thursday, 8 September 2016
9.30am Introduction
10.00am Mastering Types
  • Type Theory 101
  • Product types & Sum types
  • Supertypes & Subtypes
  • Universals & Existentials
  • Higher-Kinded Types
  • Type Lambdas
1.00pm Lunch
2.00pm Mastering Functions
  • Higher-Order Functions
  • Combinators
  • Polymorphic Functions
3.00pm Mastering Typeclasses
  • Classes & Instances
  • Tricks with Implicits
  • Polymorphic Constraints
4.00pm Mastering Functional Data
  • Immutable Data & Recursion
  • Catamorphisms & Church Encoding
  • Fixed-Point Data
  • Recursion Schemes
6.00pm End of day
Friday, 9 September 2016
9.30am Introduction
10.00am Mastering Functional Patterns
  • Options, Eithers & Validations
  • Semigroups & Monoids
  • Functors
  • Applicatives
  • Monads
  • Foldables & Traversables
  • Lenses
1.00pm Lunch
2.00pm Mastering Functional Architecture
  • Modern Architecture for FP
  • Reified Computation & Deferred Evaluation
  • Compositional Evaluators
  • Optimization Techniques
  • Purely Functional Mocking
6.00pm End of day

Join the Course!

This fantastic training course is being offered on 8-9 September for only £1000+VAT, or with a 25% discount for any attendees who are self-funding it, at £750+VAT. A full breakfast and lunch at the Rheged Café are included in the cost. You can book your place on the course when registering for Scala World. We will provide an additional option later for anyone who would like to register separately for Advanced Functional Programming in Scala.

Tuesday, 13 September

Shuttle bus from Sandgate, Penrith, to Rheged Centre

Sandgate Bus Station, Penrith town centre
7.45

Breakfast

Exhibition Halls
9.00

Day Two Welcome

Auditorium
9.30

Tuesday Keynote

Josh Suereth, Dick Wall, Auditorium
10.30

Break

Exhibition Halls

Can we make concurrency in Scala safer?

Philipp Haller, Auditorium
10.45

Free Monads

Paul Szulc, Lecture Theatre
11.30

Break

Exhibition Halls
11.45

First-class coroutines for Scala

Aleksandar Prokopec, Auditorium
12.15

Lunch

Exhibition Halls

quaich: A “serverless” microframework for event-driven Scala Programming on AWS Lambda

Brendan McAdams, Lecture Theatre
13.30

Tales from Compiling to the JVM

Lukas Rytz, Auditorium
14.15

Staged Parser Combinators

Manohar Jonnalagedda, Auditorium
15.00

Break

Exhibition Halls

Essential vs. Accidental Complexity in Scala & Dotty: Towards a Puzzler-free Future?

Andrew Phillips, Lecture Theatre
15.15

The Story of a Parallel Scala Library

Vlad Ureche, Auditorium
16.00

Managing Your Resources

Denys Shabalin, Auditorium
16.45

Break

Exhibition Halls
17.00

Closing panel

Auditorium
18.00

Close

18.30

Bus from Rheged Centre to Penrith

Rheged Centre Car Park